Posts Tagged ‘BBQ’

Bottoms Up

19th March 2011 by Helen
Growley

Growley

What a fantastic day!!  We started off by meeting up with Chris & Dawn and member of the Secret Car Club in Ranchero Santa Fe (location of map posting for today), for some of Dawn’s fantastic lemon drizzle cake, coffee and chat.  Apart from Growly, the club’s Series 2 mascot, there were a few other Land Rovers, a lovely old Roller, a few Jags, a Smart Car, a Mini Cooper S (that took us back to when Paul had a Mini in the 1970’s), a Porche, an amazing old VW, among others too varied to list.

a couple of attendees at the Secret Car Club meet in Rancho Santa Fe

a couple of attendees at the Secret Car Club meet in Rancho Santa Fe

Then we headed south a little towards San Diego and ‘The British Garage’ for a bit of Bottom’s Up.  Paul was a little miffed that heading down the I5 we were struggling to keep up with Growly, but it was a fine old procession we were in, being followed rather sedately as we were by the lovely old Roller that could have shamed us all had he a mind to.

Paul & Andy inspect Landy's bottom - and the Sedona mud still clinging to his underside

Paul & Andy inspect Landy's bottom - and the Sedona mud still clinging to his underside

Specialising in Land Rovers and Minis, Andy of The British Garage, had Landy up in the air for an underside inspection.  Despite having had a bit of a jet wash after we left ‘Red Rock Country’ a few weeks ago, some of the famous Sedona red sand could still be found clinging to Landy’s underside.  While up in the air Andy changed Landy’s differential and transfer box oils, and topped up the gearbox oil.  This was all much needed, judging from the colour and consistency of the oil that came out.  Paul was concerned about the worrying quantity of ‘metal filings’ in the transfer box oil, which was very black, as were both differential oils, however Paul was pleased to see that the rear differential oil was not emulsified, as it had been in Russia.  It’s hard to say for sure but it seems quite possible that the ‘metal filings’ in the transfer box were the result of the shocks to the system when we broke the half shaft in Siberia and had to drive some 70 miles back out of the forest again.  The last time those oils had been changed were when we asked the Dealership in Stavrapol to include that in the work they had carried out way back in June 2010.

British Bulldog - the obvious mascot for a British Motor Vehicles garage!

British Bulldog - the obvious mascot for a British Motor Vehicles garage!

Less happily we found that there is some ‘play’ in the prop shaft, which will need to be fixed before we need to put more pressure on the workings as we hit the rougher roads ahead.  But we would rather have found out now than out in the field with a problem.

Lunch was an amazing BBQ and salad at the garage, before we all went our separate ways at the end of the day.  Paul & I were happy to accept an offer to stay back at Rancho Santa Fe, in the guest cottage of one of the club members there.

Campsite – Ranchero Santa Fe

Reversing down the Alaska Highway

9th November 2010 by Helen
We joined the Alaska Highway at Delta Junction ready to travel south

We joined the Alaska Highway at Delta Junction ready to travel south

Waking up this morning we cooked up our sausages on our small stove.  Seemed to take forever in the below freezing temperatures.

The campsite is really well catered for in the summer season.  There is a log cabin for public use.  Peering through the windows, we could see a wood stove for heating, a large area set aside for kitchen facilities, big pine table and plenty of seating.  The mezzanine floor is presumably available for sleeping.  We would have loved to have had a look inside but it was already padlocked shut for the winter.  As well as plenty of benches for day campers there were sturdy braziers for BBQs and wood in the wood pile under the porch of the log cabin.  Campers pitch their tents in among the trees.  The launch for the boats is easy to access and runs straight into the lake from the campsite.

We took a short walk around the edge of the campsite looking at all the animal tracks.  Clearly the four-legged hunters had been out and active while we had been asleep.  In amongst the trees was evidence of the squirrels feasting on the pine nuts they’d found.  The surface of the lake itself was rock hard and we could see where fishermen had been down there and drilled holes in the ice to go fishing.  Tyre tracks across parts of the ice suggested the depth of the ice was pretty thick.

Explaining the history of the Alaska Highway

Explaining the history of the Alaska Highway

Sorry to have to rush away we cleared up and headed south again. 

The change in Landy’s plans mean we have to negotiate one of the bureaucratic challenges of travelling again.  In this case it means we have to find an attorney as a matter of urgency to get the power of attorney signed so our US agent can act on our behalf with Customs.  So, we had to stop at the next main town on our route, which was Delta Junction.  No signs to be found anywhere for Lawyers or ‘Notaries’.  The teenagers working in the garage don’t seem to know what an attorney, lawyer or notary is (maybe that’s a good thing, least they won’t already have had to use the services of one in their short lives so far), but they do direct us to the court house who have the power to act as a notary and we got our POA signed.  Then it’s off to the library to get it faxed!!

We hope we don't meet one of these in this manner - not so forgiving as the hind quarters of a horse

We hope we don't meet one of these in this manner - not so forgiving as the hind quarters of a horse

Delta Junction is famed for it being the end of the Alaska Highway, built in just 8 months by the US army in response to security concerns raised by the bombing of Pearl Harbour in 1942.

From there we made good time down through Tok (pronounced like ‘oak’ with a t on the front) and camped just short of the Alaskan-Canadian border.  Temperatures still below freezing day and night (average minus 7 C).

Route: Delta Junction / Tok / camped just short of the Alaskan/Canadian border