Posts Tagged ‘history’

We’ve arrived in Mexico

4th May 2011 by Helen

Another one of them veritable cascades of blogs about to follow (dated according to when they happened).  But just in case you don’t want to read them all – here’s the summary.

After a quiet couple of final days in Texas (blog titles: Heading out; Our final day in America) we crossed the border into Mexico on Easter Monday.  It was a bit of a dash away from the border, as this is where most of the ‘troubles’ are at present.

The last week has been a bit of a cultural week for us.  We spent a couple of days at Real de Catorce (blog titles: Arrival in Mexico; An old Mexican town; Chicken broth), a lovely old silver mining town but probably better known now as a tourist spot and its role as a film set.  Then we spent a day at San Miguel de Allende which was the seat of the uprising and independence movement in 1810.  After that we headed out to the pyramids just north east of Mexico City.  We spent a couple of days in this area because we discovered the local town Tecamac was just starting a week long celebration with lots of amazing displays of local dancing and music, street vendors selling food, and lots of other stuff going on.   More detail and photos in the blogs for those days.

The advice we have been given is to stick to the towns and main roads and not to travel at night.  We have largely heeded that advice.  But that has meant that wild camping has not really been possible and so we have reverted to the habit of Siberia and been camping among the trucks in the truck parks.  No-one seems to think it odd to see a little Land Rover with a tent on the roof in a truck park and it’s been an easy little routine.  The trucks around us make lots of noise with reversing alarms, air brakes, running engines, generators, coming and going generally.  Of course, as usual, I pretty much sleep through all this.  Paul has found the answer in ear plugs!!

I have also discovered an amazing (new to me) crisp flavour – chilli and lime – the lime flavour is really strong and yanks the saliva from your saliva glands ready to spray your burning tongue from the chilli.  Really works and very tasty.

We both suffered from the effects of some ingestion that disagreed with us.  Paul took delight in making me eat chicken broth in my recovery – a memory of childhood illness and subsequent torture he suffered.  I tell him it’s nothing compared to the dry toast and cornflour mixed in milk my mother inflicted on me as a child, to pleas of “do I have to eat any more?”!!  I think I had the worse deal.

Wild West and the Pony Express

27th January 2011 by Helen
a quick and easy breakfast at our frosty campsite just past the town of Gold Hill

a quick and easy breakfast at our frosty campsite just past the town of Gold Hill

We spent much of the day following a part of the Pony Express trail that runs through the desert plains of Utah, below Bonneville and Salt Lakes.  If ever there was a part of the country that would remind us of the Westerns we watched as kids, this was it.  It was not hard to imagine the white settlers holed up in their flimsy houses out on the prairie, fearful of attacks from the native Indians.  The scenes were of hills and plains, barren and desolate.  We passed old abandoned hoppers where some kind of mining had presumably been carried out in the past and rocky hills eroded by the wind and weather.  Small stunted bushes were everywhere with only the occasional small stunted trees.

Landy pulls up at the Boyd Pony Express Station

Landy pulls up at the Boyd Pony Express Station

We stopped at some of the old Pony Express staging posts, including Canyon Station and Boyd Station, where they changed horses in the race to get the mail from east to west.  It’s hard to believe that the Pony Express which was such an important part of this time in American history, only lasted a couple of years, put out of business by the development of the telegraph.

in the mouth of Hot Springs Cave

in the mouth of Hot Springs Cave

We passed an old cave in a hill, called Hot Springs Cave, where we climbed to see the view and take some photos, before heading on through Fish Springs National Wildlife Reserve and the Fish Springs Staging Post.  This was where we left the Pony Express Trail to pick up the road to Delta on our way to Moab.

Town map

Town map

After passing through the farming town of Callao we stopped to look at some amazing eroded sandstone hills.  It seemed a good place to camp and we had a warming evening beside a campfire, good old Western style, at the foot of these ancient rock formations.  We could see the area had recently been visited by a herd of Pronghorn Deer – whose tracks were all over the place.  Apart from that there were no birds, no insects, no noise, just us, the desert, the juniper trees and a myriad of stars hanging in the night sky.

campsite at the foot of the eroded sandstone cliffs

campsite at the foot of the eroded sandstone cliffs

Campsite – at the foot of the sandstone cliffs, close to the Thomas Range Mountains – camped at 5361 feet

Distance travelled – 67 miles

Happy Thanksgiving

25th November 2010 by Helen

Pending the posting of the blogs covering our final dash to the sunshine state – after a breakfast of bagels with cream cheese followed by pumpkin pie – Happy Thanksgiving

PS – sorry if RSS feeders have had several messages – it took me that long to embed the video!!